Telluride Yoga Center: Classes For All Levels

[click "Play" to hear Susan's conversation with Kristin Taylor]

 

Kristin & Albert Here’s what the Telluride Yoga Center does not offer: hip-hop yoga or yoga for dogs. (Yep, those variations on the theme are out there, along with circus yoga, acrobatic yoga, even Christian yoga, also not on the schedule.) Otherwise, Telluride’s original yoga studio, located at 201 West Colorado Avenue, Suite 200, in the historic Nugget Building, offers something for everyone.

And that means you. Even if you are not young and buff. Even if you can’t bend like pretzel. Even if you have nagging injuries. Even if you you are a jock who gets plenty of exercise. Maybe especially if you are a jock who gets plenty of exercise, but has no clue how to breath or simply need to chill out. My teacher, Gary Kraftsow, of the American Viniyoga Institute, once defined yoga at the level of asana (postures) as “flossing for the spine.” What could be more basic than spine health.

At the level of asana alone, a regular yoga practice can promote structural integrity, physiological immunity and emotional well being. With enough practice, we get to discover the mood-altering effects of the postures. The real goodies of a yoga practice, however, enter the picture once we are no longer distracted by muscular tensions and our To-Do lists.

In April, the Telluride Yoga Center switched hands. It is now owned and run by Albert Roer, managing partner of Telluride Properties (and a long time practitioner), and Kristin Taylor. Kristin was born in Telluride and now teaches Prana Flow Yoga, an approach to asana and breath developed by Shiva Rea.

Kristin and Albert worked hard from the get-go to design a round, firm and fully packed summer schedule at their Telluride Yoga Center, a line-up that would be all inclusive, with everything from yoga basics (I teach one of those classes on Tuesday at 2 p.m.), to intros to Ashtanga, Anusara, and Iyengar, even meditation.

The point is the Telluride Yoga Center is not all about gnarly asana, a common misconception on the street. Yes, those strong classes exist, but they are part of a story, not the whole enchilada.

Interested in learning more? Click the “play” button and listen to Kristin’s interview.

Photo of Kristin and Albert by Melissa Plantz

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Susan Viebrock

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