"Twelve Days Of Christmas": Cost Of Doing Business

The swans, above, at $1,000 each, are the costliest gift, although the price hasn't budged from 30 years ago. (From New York Times Biz section post)

The swans, above, at $1,000 each, are the costliest gift, although the price hasn’t budged from 30 years ago. (From New York Times Biz section post)

Turns out the cost of engaging the lords and ladies went up the most. The price of the fowl held steady. Swans are the big ticket. The Business section of Christmas Day New York Times featured a great story by Elizabeth Olson about the going with the program outlined in the ditty over the 12 days of ready, aim, shop. A good read if you are experiencing sticker shock from your recent binge.

A fanciful splurge over the holidays will cost more than ever this year, at least for those who take their gift cues from the popular holiday classic “The Twelve Days of Christmas.”

An improving economy has driven the cost for one round of the dozen days of whimsical gifts to $27,393 this year, up $1,962, or 7.7 percent, over last year, according to an annual snapshot of how the costs of goods and services affect the economy. The price reflects the largest increase for the eccentric shopping list since 2010, when the index rose 9.2 percent.

Those who might have a lake or large pond can breathe easy this year, according to the tally by PNC Wealth Management, part of the PNC Financial Services Group, because the cost for seven swans a-swimming remains $7,000 — the same as three decades ago.

That is when PNC started the goods and services index to show how much the parade of unforgettable presents — from a partridge in a pear tree to 12 drummers drumming — would cost a “true love” to give.

For the rest of the menu, continue reading here….

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Susan Viebrock

Susan Viebrock

Susan is Telluride Inside… and Out’s founder and editor-in-chief, the visionary on the team, in charge of content, concept and development. For 19+ years, Susan has covered Telluride’s cultural economy, which includes non-profits and special events. Much of her writing features high-profile individuals in the arts, entertainment, business, and politics. She is a former Citibank executive specializing in strategic planning and new business development, and a certified Viniyoga instructor.

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